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Ryrie-Campbell Special Items Collection

Letter to Sylvia
A 3-page handwritten letter by L.M. Montgomery, sent from Norval, Ontario, to a woman "Sylvia" (no further information on this person is known at present). Montgomery apologizes that the paper and envelope used are all she can find at present, citing the "confusion" of "packing up to move" (presumably from Norval to Toronto), and that she cannot provide more than a "short note of acknowledgment and thanks," as she receives so much "fan" mail. Other topics mentioned include films of her books, and her writing, with allusions to "my old publishers, (who really didn't use me well)," and plans for forthcoming novels. Montgomery also notes "my husband is retiring because of his health," so she will finally have her own home., The letter was donated with a fragment of the envelope in which it was sent, but about one-third of the front is missing, so recipient's full name and address, along with any postmark, is missing., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Note to "Agnes"
A brief handwritten note by Lucy Maud Montgomery to a woman named Agnes (no further information on this person is known at present). The note was subsequently clipped and pasted onto a backing sheet, along with a clipped postmark -- "Toronto, Ont. Jan 18 11 AM 1936" -- and a piece of a book dust jacket (which appears to be from one of the orange jackets published by Harrap), reading "L.M. Montgomery, Author of 'Anne of Green Gables'". There is some handwriting of unknown provenance and unclear meaning on the verso of the backing sheet., The donated item was accompanied by a Certificate of Authentication for Montgomery's signature from Fraser's Autographs (London, UK)., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Signed portrait of L.M. Montgomery, ca. 1935
Black and white photographic portrait print of Lucy Maud Montgomery, wearing a light-coloured hat, taken ca. 1935. Handwritten signature, "L.M. Montgomery.", Item was donated with a clipped catalogue listing from Aquila Books, Spring 2014., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
McClelland and Stewart promotional postcard
Postcard issued by L.M. Montgomery's Canadian publishers, McClelland and Stewart Limited. The front includes a photo print of Montgomery smiling, kneeling in a field of daises in "the 'Anne' and 'Emily' Country [Prince Edward Island]." Below this image is a reproduction of Montgomery's signature, and a short biographical sketch. The back includes a listing of "bright, readable, wholesome, entertaining books by L.M. Montgomery." The most recent of the works listed, going by original publication date, is Magic for Marigold, first released in 1929, suggesting that the card was released that year., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Soldier and religious verse postcard
A postcard, bearing a handwritten message in L.M. Montgomery's handwriting, "With the Season's greetings from the Manse folks, Xmas 1919". The addressee is Ms. L.M. McKnight of Uxbridge, Ontario. The front of the card bears a colourized photographic image of a soldier, in British First World War-era officer's uniform, with his arms raised and looking heavenwards; this is superimposed on a stylized depiction of golden light flowing from a white cross above. Another colourized image at right appears to show soldiers lying on a field, though the scale of reproduction makes any subject matter unclear. Above this image, "Trust in the Lord" is printed in ornate script, and the opening verses of the hymn, "Lead Kindly Light" are printed below. "Bamforth Copyright" is printed at lower left in small type: Bamforth and Company was a UK-based postcard publisher, known chiefly for its "naughty" cards, but it also produced a more reverential series, featuring soldiers and religious verse, during the First World War., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Monument to the pioneers of the Silver Fox Industry at Alberton, Prince Edward Island postcard.
Item 3 of 3 in a small collection of postcards showing Prince Edward Island scenes, all addressed to Miss Edith Russell of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Edith May Russell (1877-1957) was hired to work in the newsroom of the Halifax, Nova Scotia newspaper 'The Daily Echo' in 1902, during the time L.M. Montgomery was employed there; notes in Montgomery's journals suggest the two kept in intermittent contact for some years thereafter, into the 1920s. This postcard bears a tinted / colourized photograph of the Silver Fox monument in Alberton, Prince Edward Island. The sender, identified only by a signature as "Ed. White", has no known connection to L.M. Montgomery, and the short message on the postcard makes no reference to anything Montgomery-related. The postmark is for Charlottetown, September 4, 1952., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
"There is a pleasure in the pathless woods"postcard.
A postcard addressed to "Mrs. L.M. Macdonald, The Manse, Leaskdale, Ontario, Canada". The sender signs themselves "A.M. Trainor": research by the donor has identified this person as a member of the publishing staff of the L.C. Page Company of Boston, L.M. Montgomery's publisher from 1908 through to 1915. The handwritten message on the card reads simply: "I am sending ms. by tomorrow's mail." Assuming "ms" was being used as the common abbreviation for manuscript, this message raises interesting questions about why a representative of Montgomery's Boston-based publisher would be sending Montgomery a manuscript from Charlottetown to her Ontario home, especially when Montgomery spent much of July and August 1913 visiting Prince Edward Island. The postmark is still quite legible, and confirms the postage date as June 17, 1913: it is notable that L.C. Page did release Montgomery's sixth book, "The Golden Road" on or about September 1st, 1913. On the front of the postcard is a tinted / colourized photograph, shot through trees on shore, of a small boat riding at anchor. There is also a printed stanza of verse, from Byron's "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage", followed by "Prince Edward Island"., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
"Foaming Billows" postcard
A postcard addressed to "Miss L.M. Montgomery, Cavendish, P.E.I. Canada". There is no message or signature on the card, but the postmark indicates it was sent from Glasgow, Scotland on March 4, 1907; research by the donor has verified the handwriting to be that of the Reverend Ewen (Ewan) Macdonald (1870-1943), who is known to have been studying at the University of Glasgow at the time the card was sent. Macdonald and L.M. Montgomery had become secretly engaged in 1906, shortly before his departure to Scotland, although they did not marry until 1911, following the death of Montgomery's grandmother. The image on the front is a reproduction -- probably a blue-ink collotype -- of a photograph of breaking waves, with the printed caption "Foaming Billows"; printing on the back identifies the card as a product of the London-based Rotary Photographic Company., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Bathing Scene, P.E. Island postcard
Postcard with message from L.M. Montgomery addressed to "Miss Edith Russell" in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Edith May Russell (1877-1957) was hired to work in the newsroom of the Halifax, Nova Scotia newspaper 'The Daily Echo" in 1902, during the time L.M. Montgomery was employed there; notes in Montgomery's journals suggest the two kept in intermittent contact for some years thereafter, into the 1920s. The message on the card thanks Russell for her "quaint [?] pretty card and kind congratulations," but no further information is provided ('Anne of Green Gables' was not printed until April, 1908, and Montgomery did receive a copy herself until early June). Montgomery also asks for the address of a "Mr. McLellan"; research by the donor and the UPEI Library suggests that this refers to William Edward MacLellan (1855-1929), who was editor-in-chief of the Halifax 'Daily Echo' newspaper from 1900-1905, encompassing the time L.M. Montgomery worked there. The front of the card is a poor-quality coloured lithograph; Montgomery herself apologizes in her message for not having a "nicer" card to send., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Kilmeny of the Orchard promotional postcard
Promotional postcard from the publisher L.C. Page & Company of Boston, Massachusetts, for Montgomery's third novel, 'Kilmeny of the Orchard'. The front of the card includes the George Gibbs colour illustration of Kilmeny that appeared on the first edition's cover, showing a young woman in a blue-white blouse, wearing her black hair in two braids. The card text identifies L.M. Montgomery as the author of 'Anne of Green Gables (20th Printing) and Anne of Avonlea (9th Printing)' showing the publisher's eagerness to promote the popular success of Montgomery's two earlier books. No date is printed on the card, and the spaces on the back of the card for message and address are blank; the promotional text announces "Now Ready", suggesting that the card was printed to coincide with the first printing of 'Kilmeny of the Orchard' in April, 1910.
Charlottetown, P.E. Island From Fort Edward postcard
A postcard, addressed -- in L.M. Montgomery's handwriting -- to "Miss Edith Russell" of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Edith May Russell (1877-1957) was hired to work in the newsroom of the Halifax, Nova Scotia newspaper 'The Daily Echo' in 1902, during the time L.M. Montgomery was employed there; notes in Montgomery's journals -- and surviving correspondence, including this postcard -- suggest the two kept in intermittent contact for some years thereafter; indeed, Montgomery would note, on the occasion of her 25th wedding anniversary in 1936, that she had received a congratulatory card from Russell. Another collector of Mongomeriana, the late Christy Woster, acquired a postcard from Montgomery to Russell, dated October, 1906, with a note suggesting that Montgomery and Russell were helping each other collect local postcards. This might explain why this card bears an address but no message: the postmark on this card is for Cavendish, May 21, 1907, and by this time Russell and Montgomery may have been exchanging postcards fairly regularly. The image of the front of the card is a coloured lithograph of the historic Fort Edward Battery (now Prince Edward Battery Historic Site), looking northeast towards Victoria Park, Government House (Fanningbank), and Beaconsfield., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
New Art Museum Boston, Mass. postcard.
Postcard found enclosed with the copy of Julia de Wolf Addison's book 'Boston Museum of Fine Arts' (SPEC-LMMI 900 SI-Bertie); a coloured lithograph of the Museum appears on the front of the card. Neither the sender -- identified only with unclear initials (possibly "E.P.") -- or the addressee -- a "Mrs. E. Linwood Perkins" of Auburn, Maine -- have any known connection to L.M. Montgomery, nor does the message on the card refer to anything Montgomery-related. Further, the postmark -- March 7, 1910 -- is many months before Montgomery's November visit to Boston. It appears likely, then, that this item was acquired by a collector interested in the Museum, not in Montgomery, and enclosed with the de Wolf Addison book at that time., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
'Island Hymn' words and music, 1908 printing
Printed sheet showing the music and words of the 'Island Hymn' -- "Words by Miss L.M. Montgomery[,] Music by Lawrence W. Watson, M.A.". The hymn was an initiative of Charlottetown music educator Professor Harry Watts, who in early 1908 decided that P.E.I. needed a patriotic song to call its own: at the suggestion of a local Presbyterian clergyman, Watts invited L.M. Montgomery -- not yet famous for 'Anne of Green Gables,' but enjoying a local reputation for her short stories and poetry -- to pen some suitable verse. Montgomery evidently met the request quickly, and Watts then arranged for Charlottetown church organist Lawrence W. Watson to set her three stanzas to music: Watson named the resulting tune "Insula beata" (Latin for "blessed" or "happy" island). Watts promoted the "Island Hymn" vigorously, especially to P.E.I. schools, and this printing was evidently part of that effort: 'The Guardian' (Charlottetown) reported on May 9, 1908 that the Provincial Government was arranging for the words and music to be printed for distribution to all Island schools, with plans to perform it at the late June school closing exercises. The sheet includes the note that "only a limited number of copies of this are printed," and few surviving copies of this printing are known today. The printed sheet includes a statement that it is "published by permission of Author and composer," but assigns copyright as follows: "Copyright, Canada, 1908, by L.W. Watson". Watson, however, never enjoyed any measure of the fame and success realized by L.M. Montgomery, and the enduring popularity of 'The 'Island Hymn' over the years is now firmly established as part of the Montgomery legacy. The Island Hymn was officially designated as Prince Edward Island's Provincial Anthem in May, 2010., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Carrie Stavert autograph book, signed by L.M. Montgomery.
Autograph book, kept by Carrie Stavert of Wilmot Valley, Prince Edward Island. Listings of teachers presented in the Appendices of the Journals of the Prince Edward Island Legislative Assembly show a Carrie Stavert teaching at Lower Bedeque, Prince Edward Island, from January to June, 1897; L.M. Montgomery taught in Lower Bedeque from the Fall of 1897 through to late March of 1898, so it is likely the two women knew each other as teachers. No other connection between the two women is known at this time. L.M. Montgomery placed her inscription in Stavert's book on March 16, 1898, just two weeks before she returned to Cavendish to spend the next dozen years caring for her Grandmother Macneill, following the death of her Grandfather Macneill on March 5th; her entry in Stavert's book gives no indication of these major life changes, however, offering simply a short verse -- "Our lives are albums written through, etc." -- popular in autograph albums of the era and commonly ascribed to American poet John Greenleaf Whittier, and signing herself "Yours sincerely, L.M. Montgomery". Montgomery's signature appears less than half-way through the album -- on the 22nd of 56 unnumbered pages -- but near the end of the chronological span of entries (1891-1898)., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
The Book News Monthly (September, 1909)
This issue of 'The Book News Monthly' contains evidence of the rapid success enjoyed by L.M. Montgomery, and by her publisher, L.C. Page & Co, following the publication of 'Anne of Green Gables' in 1908. Page 14 in the front advertising section -- facing the issue Table of Contents, and so likely one of the most expensive for advertising placement -- contains a half-page ad from L.C. Page proclaiming 'Anne of Green Gables' "Still in the lead" and already on its twelfth printing; the ad also promotes Montgomery's second book, 'Anne of Avonlea' as available on September 1st. Page 19 in the back advertising section includes Anne of Avonlea first in the Wanamaker "New Books List", which was arranged alphabetically by title. This exposure, along with the full page Frontispiece Portrait enclosed with the issue (Special Item: 909 SI LMM BNM 1909), show the significant effort undertaken by Montgomery's publisher to build her profile in the American market., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
L.M. Montgomery
This reproduction photographic portrait, inserted as a Frontispiece Portrait in the September 1909 issue of 'The Book News Monthly' (Special Item: 910 SI BNM 1909) offers evidence of the rapid success enjoyed by L.M. Montgomery, and by her publisher, L.C. Page & Co, following the publication of 'Anne of Green Gables' in 1908. Montgomery mentioned sitting for this photo portrait in a letter to Ephraim Weber, dated March 28, 1909: "I sat for one the other day as the Page Co. insisted on a new one for the 'The Book News Monthly.' They wanted a head and shoulders picture and the result is not like me, though passable as a picture." Although a handful of photographs of Montgomery taken earlier in her life have survived, this reproduction likely represents one of the first "publicity" photographs taken of her, since she enjoyed only a local reputation prior to the publication of 'Anne of Green Gables'. Along with the prominent advertising placement for 'Anne of Green Gables' and 'Anne of Avonlea' found in the accompanying issue of 'Book News Monthly', this portrait shows the significant effort undertaken by Montgomery's publisher to build her profile in the American market., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Scene at Crapaud, Prince Edward Island postcard
This postcard has several connections to L.M. Montgomery: firstly, the dating and postmark indicate it was sent from Cavendish on September 25, 1909, during the period when Montgomery was operating the Cavendish post office with her grandmother, Lucy Ann Macneill, from the Macneill family home. More significantly, the postcard is signed "Your aff. cousin Prescott," and is addressed to Murray Macneill: this indicates the card being sent by Montgomery's first cousin, Prescott Macneill, to another first cousin, Murray Macneill., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Autographed calling card
A small calling card, with name "Hope Elsbree" printed on the front: on the back, in L.M. Montgomery's handwriting, appears the message, "Yours sincerely, L.M. Montgomery"., This item was donated accompanied by a postal enveloped, addressed to Miss Hope Elsbree in Providence, Rhode Island. The envelope also bears postmarks for Leaskdale, Ontario, and Uxbridge, Ontario (the last dated June 20 1917). A note from the donor indicates the Miss Elsbree evidently wrote L.M. Montgomery requesting that the author autograph her calling card. The envelope was also found to contain a small, handwritten note, reading "Lucy Maud Montgomery, 1874-1942 Canadian Novelist - 'Anne of Green Gables' 1908"., L.M. Montgomery Collection. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Sandford Womens Institute at home of Mr. John Thompson.
Black and white print of a photograph of a group of approx. 30 women, accompanied by six small children and infants, and one middle-aged man. Despite the large number in the group, and the relatively small size of the print, the faces of almost everyone in the image are very clear, and Lucy Maud Montgomery is readily identifiable in the back row, second from right. A note on the back of the print's mounting card, written in unidentified hand, reads "Sandford Womans [sic] Institute at home of John Thompson about 1915." Sandford is a village roughly equidistant between Leaskdale and Uxbridge, Ontario, so it is not surprising that Montgomery would have some connection with the W.I. in this village during her years residing in nearby Leaskdake., The item was donated with a handwritten card, entitled "Sandford Womens Institute at Home of Mrs. John Thompson: Summer of 1915". The names of all individuals in the photograph are written out below, with L.M. Montgomery identified as, "Mrs. (Rev.) Evan McDonald [sic] (L.M. Montgomery)"., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Charlottetown's Beautiful Harbour, Prince Edward Island postcard.
L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell., A postcard, bearing a handwritten message in L.M. Montgomery's handwriting to "Miss Edith Russell" of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Edith May Russell (1877-1957) was hired to work in the newsroom of the Halifax, Nova Scotia newspaper 'The Daily Echo' in 1902, during the time L.M. Montgomery was employed there; notes in Montgomery's journals -- and surviving correspondence, including this postcard -- suggest the two kept in intermittent contact for some years thereafter; indeed, Montgomery would note, on the occasion of her 25th wedding anniversary in 1936, that she had received a congratulatory card from Russell. This particular note to Russell is very short, however, simply acknowledging receipt of Russell's letter and promising to write soon. There is also a line, "hope this card will fill the bill": another collector of Mongomeriana, the late Christy Woster, acquired a postcard from Montgomery to Russell, dated October, 1906, with a note suggesting that Montgomery and Russell were helping each other collect local postcards. Other noteworthy features of this postcard are its legible postmark -- Cavendish, June 8, 1906 -- as well as text clearly identifying the card's publisher: "Carter & Co., Limited, Souvenirs, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island." The quality of printed image -- a coloured lithograph of two small boats under sail -- is also better than many postcards of the era.
Greetings from the Manse postcard
Postcard, printed on the front with a black and white photographic image of L.M. Montgomery standing with her husband, Rev. Ewan Macdonald, and their two sons, Chester and Stuart; a note -- in L.M. Montgomery's handwriting -- reading "Greetings from the Manse", appears below. The postcard is addressed on the back -- again, in Montgomery's handwriting -- to Mr. and Mrs. Dickson of Leaskdale, Ontario., This item was gifted with a note from the donor indicating that it was likely taken in 1925, and sent out at Christmastime that year, shortly before Montgomery's family moved to Norval, Ontario in February, 1926., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Letter and photograph sent to fan
A handwritten letter, on card stock, sent from "The Manse, Norval, Ont", written by L.M. Montgomery to a fan in Australia; letter is dated October 19, 1929. In the note, Montgomery remarks the she since has received "hundreds" of letters from Australian readers since her address was published by a newspaper there. Montgomery also enclosed a signed black and white photo of herself, but asked that the recipient "not let it be generally seen," as she considered most photographs of herself unflattering., Letter and photograph were donated with printed e-mail correspondence confirming provenance with descendants of original recipient, Clare Keever (nee Valentine), of Newcastle, Australia., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Portrait photograph of publisher Lewis (Louis) Coues Page
A large, sepia-toned print of a photographic portrait of Boston publisher Lewis (sometimes referred to as "Louis") Coues Page (1869-1956). Page was founder of L.C. Page and Company, renamed the Page Company in 1914: from 1908 - 1915, Page published L.M. Montgomery's first seven books; in 1920, five years after his contract with Montgomery had expired, Page also published an unauthorized book, culled from earlier manuscripts, entitled 'Further Chronicles of Avonlea', resulting in a protracted lawsuit in which Montgomery was ultimately victorious. The inked studio signature on the portrait print indicates it was taken in 1937, and the image shows Page as a robust and well-dressed man in his 60s. Page's public profile as a wealthy and successful businessman is reinforced by the large, high-quality printing and professional composition of the photo, which was originally enclosed in an elaborate card-stock folio (now broken and stained, although the photo print remains in good condition) bearing the imprint of the prestigious Moffett Studio of Chicago. Research by the donor indicates that this is one of the few surviving photographs of Page., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Pastoral Scene, Prince Edward Island postcard
Item 2 of 3 in a small collection of postcards showing Prince Edward Island scenes, all addressed to Miss Edith Russell of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Edith May Russell (1877-1957) was hired to work in the newsroom of the Halifax, Nova Scotia newspaper 'The Daily Echo" in 1902, during the time L.M. Montgomery was employed there; notes in Montgomery's journals and surviving correspondence -- including this postcard --indicated that the two women kept in intermittent contact for many years thereafter, into the 1930s. This postcard bears a tinted / colourized lithographic image of cows grazing along a dirt road, with a bridge over a stream in the foreground. The sender, identified only by a signature as "Mrs. Richards", has no known connection to L.M. Montgomery, and the short message on the postcard makes no reference to anything Montgomery-related. The postmark is unclear, but the place of writing is identified as "North River, P.E.I."; research by the donor has dated the postcard to 1910.
A visit to Mammoth Cove
A handwritten manuscript by Lucy Maud Montgomery describing her visit to Mammoth Cave, Kentucky (designated Mammoth Cave National Park in 1941) in August, 1924, during a family vacation. No published version of this account is known, but Montgomery's longstanding fascination with Mammoth Cave was well-documented in her journals and correspondence, and she later gave a number of public lectures on the visit., Manuscript was donated on the occasion of the L.M. Montgomery Institute's 20th Anniversary (June 20, 2013)., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Fires of Drift-Wood
Former owner: L. M. Montgomery. Provenance: research by donor has verified that volume was gifted by L.M. Montgomery to her cousin and close friend Beatrice Alberta ("Bertie") McIntyre. A holograph inscription on front end paper as follows: "Dearest, I hope you will find in these poems the pleasure I have found in my copy. They seem echoes of the old days where we tasted life together. Lovingly yours, Maud, 1923" Slight separation of front end paper from front page ; minor edge wear, minor stain top front p. through p. 15 ; missing dust jacket . [all lines hand-lettered within three wavy rectangles; the first four lines and the illustrations are within a separate rectangle divided into three compartments] / [illustration of stars] / [curved ornamental line] / FIRES OF / DRIFTWOOD / BY ISABEL ECCLESTONE MACKAY / [double rule with an extra rule at each end] / [the next line above an illustration of flames rising from an ocean up to stars] / WITH DECORATIONS BY J [ornament] E [ornament] H [ornament] MACDONALD A [ornament] R [ornament] C [ornament] A [ornament] / McCLELLAND [the c is raised with a small ornament below it] AND STEWART / PUBLISHERS [ornament] TORONTO (p.215) Issued in black paper boards, quarter-bound with red cloth, with illustration of waves and fire stamped in gold on upper board. Printed by Warwick Bros. & Rutter, Lts. Reprinted in December 1922. Decoration by J.E.H. MacDonald, [member of the Group of Seven ; decorations include Binding, t.p., dust jacket and end papers], lettering by Thoreau MacDonald. The sheets from this edition were used in The Complete Poems of Isabel Ecclestone MacKay published by M&S in 1930., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
South African Soldier's Monument postcard.
Item 1 of 3 in a small collection of postcards showing Prince Edward Island scenes, all addressed to Miss Edith Russell of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Edith May Russell (1877-1957) was hired to work in the newsroom of the Halifax, Nova Scotia newspaper 'The Daily Echo" in 1902, during the time L.M. Montgomery was employed there; notes in Montgomery's journals and surviving correspondence -- including this postcard --indicate that the two women kept in intermittent contact for many years thereafter, into the 1930s. . This postcard bears a tinted / colourized photograph of the South African War [Anglo-Boer War] Monument, unveiled in Charlottetown in 1903. The sender, identified only by a signature as "E.W.F.", has no known connection to L.M. Montgomery, but the handwritten message on the card includes the note: "Going to visit Lucy Montgomery's [illegible] of Cavendish this week." The postmark is unclear, but the place of writing is identified as "Central Bedeque, P.E.I."; research by the donor has dated the postcard to July 16, 1926., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
Aunt Becky Began it
L.M. Montgomery., Date of publication derived from date of author's inscription. Originally published under title: A tangled web. Ryrie-Campbell copy contains inscription by Montgomery to cousin and and close friend Beatrice Alberta ("Bertie") McIntyre., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
The Boston Museum of Fine Arts
A copy of Julia de Wolf Addison's 1910 book 'The Boston Museum of Fine Arts', published by L.C. Page and Company (publisher of Montgomery's first seven books). The book is inscribed on the front fly leaf as follows: "To Bertie with love from L.M. Montgomery [,] November 14, 1910". This volume is, therefore, an artifact of L.M. Montgomery's trip to Boston in November, 1910, for an important meeting with her publisher, and of her close friendship with her cousin Beatrice Alberta ("Bertie") McIntyre. The book was donated with an accompanying postcard (901 SI PC Boston) with a coloured lithograph of the Museum, post-marked March 7, 1910 -- this card has no apparent connection to L.M. Montgomery., L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.
The country kitchen
When McClelland & Stewart's first Canadian edition of L.M. Montgomery's 'Jane of Lantern Hill' was published in 1937 (see Ryrie-Campbell: 551 JLH-MS 1ST), it included an enthusiastic quote from L.M. Montgomery on the dust jacket back panel praising 'The Country Kitchen' (McClelland & Stewart was, presumably, the Canadian distributor for Lutes' book). Research by the donor indicates that this was Montgomery's only known promotional "blurb" for another author's book. ["First published in 1936, Della Lutes's semi-autobiographical tale of life in late nineteenth-century rural Michigan was widely acclaimed. The book includes an index to recipes hidden within the humorous narrative." from Google Books], L.M. Montgomery Institute. Ryrie-Campbell Collection., Donated by Donna Jane Campbell.