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P.E.I. Liberals gave TV series $ 1.9 - million gift
711 words, Source type: Electronic(1)
Lucy lives (Lucy Maud Montgomery's Emily's Quest)
Source type: magazines; Object type: Article; Copyright: Copyright Brick Magazine Summer 1989; DOCID: 462541561; PCID: 7160391; PMID: 55576; ProvJournalCode: BRCK; PublisherXID: CBCABRCK2138749, Source type: Electronic(1), http://search.proquest.com/docview/197946082?accountid=14670
“Learning in Cyberspace
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Passages
Joan O’Brien Ruth E. Campbell Georgie Frederica MacFarlane Campbell MacLeod, Source type: Print(0)
LMM STORIES RE-DISCOVERED
Thanks to the world-wide web and eBay, two heretofore "lost" LMM shortstories have been discovered and can be added to hundreds of others LMM wrote, published, and pasted into her own scrapbooks years ago. The late Rea Wilmshurst re-discovered, catalogued, and published collections of many of those stories in recent years under such titles as "Akin to Anne" and "Along the Shore.", Source type: Print(0)
Epperly Plaza Dedicated in June
An impressive plaza marking the entrance to the Robertson Library on the University of Prince Edward Island campus was dedicated in June, honouring Dr. Elizabeth Epperly, founder of the L. M. Montgomery Institute and fourth president of the University of Prince Edward Island. The spacious brick-paved plaza is surrounded by lush beds of flowers that were selected because of their importance to L. M. Montgomery as recorded in her books, stories, and journals. Roses, cosmos, black-eyed Susans, delphiniums, lilies, and many other floral varieties, along with evergreen shrubs and trees, form a back-drop for a bronze plaque of Betsy, unveiled at the ceremony., Source type: Print(0), http://www.weebly.com/uploads/2/2/6/5/226525/the_shining_scroll_2012_part_1.pdf
Calling All Kindreds!
L. M. Montgomery once said "I had a certain knack for choosing friends which I ... now see to have been a very vital endowment." With this quotation in mind, we would like for you to be among the first to know about a new group that has been formed in the L. M. Montgomery Institute of the University of Prince Edward Island called: "The Friends of the L. M. Montgomery Institute." This group's main goal is to raise funds to provide on-going support for the Institute's use, above and beyond the support that the University can provide at present., Source type: Print(0), http://www.weebly.com/uploads/2/2/6/5/226525/the_shining_scroll_2012_part_1.pdf
Historic recognition for old Montgomery home
“The national historic site at Cavendish was expanded August 11, 2006 to include the Macneill homestead where Lucy Maud Montgomery wrote Anne of Green Gables. The new designation also includes land surrounding the home where Montgomery lived: Lover's Lane and the Haunted Woods. Senator Don Oliver presided over a formal ceremony in Cavendish., Source type: Print(0)
To the Friends of Anne
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Bertie McIntyre
With the success of Anne of Green Gables in 1908 and Anne of Avonlea in 1909, Lucy Maud Montgomery's publisher, The L.C. Page Company wanted another book ready for a waiting public as soon as possible. They suggested printing an expanded version of a Montgomery story titled "Una of the Garden," which had appeared in a magazine in the winter of 1908. Maud began re-writing and revising Una, whose name she changed to “Kilmeny,” in the middle of November 1909, hoping to finish by a January 1 deadline. It was a difficult time for writing. Her obligations to her aging grandmother were frustrating -- even her fame and new fortune did not allow her the authority to fix up her home, get domestic help, travel or even entertain friends. She was depressed, cold, suffering from bad dreams, sleeplessness and illness. Nonetheless, Kilmeny, which reflected "very little out of {her} own experience," was completed on time., Source type: Print(0)
The Very Soul of the Universe Must Ache With Anguish
In spite of the somber title of this presentation, I am going to begin with an anguish of a different sort and that is how Montgomery got to Leaskdale in the first place – in short, the answer is through “smothered emotion.” Her journey to Ontario began in September 1909 when she was almost 35. This date is important because it determined whether this celebration would be here in Leaskdale, Ontario or elsewhere., Source type: Print(0)
Anita Webb and Aunt Maud December 13, 1911 – March 4, 1996
Anita Maud Webb was born one hundred years ago, the third daughter of Ernest and Myrtle Macneill Webb (their first child, Ina Rosamund, died in infancy in 1906). Anita Maud was named after Maud Montgomery, her mother’s good friend and neighbor for ten years (Myrtle was L.M.’s 3rd cousin). Myrtle had lived on her great-grandfather’s farm, later known as “Green Gables,” since 1894 – first with her mother, Mary Ada Macneill (Simpson) and then with her husband -- it was her home for nearly 50 years. Anita was born a few months after Lucy Maud Montgomery had married and left Prince Edward Island (in July 1911)., Source type: Print(0)
The Manse Museum
L.M. Montgomery arrived at her new home in Ontario, the Leaskdale Manse, in October 1911 after her marriage to Rev. Ewan Macdonald, the minister at St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church. Leaskdale is situated among bountiful agricultural fields and woodlands, creeks, and rolling hills on the edge of the Oak Ridges Moraine., Source type: Print(0)
A Note About Books
I want to add a postscript to Christy and Ann’s conference reports. First, I enjoyed the entertaining company of author Budge Wilson during the conference. She is a fun, witty, and humble person as well as an accomplished writer [see http://www.100yearsofanne.com/gables-wilson.htm]. She approached her task of writing Before Green Gables, the prequel to Anne of Green Gables, with diligence and respect. Meeting Budge was one of the highlights of the conference for me., Source type: Print(0)
“Lest We Forget” Rainbow Valley
Lucy Maud Montgomery dedicated her novel about Anne’s children, Rainbow Valley, to three young men from her community in Ontario who died in The Great War (1914 to 1918). Her husband, Ewan Macdonald, was the Presbyterian minister for the church that the boys and their families attended. She finished the book in January 1919, a few months after the end of the war., Source type: Print(0)
L.M. Montgomery and World War I in Leaskdale, Ontario
When Lucy Maud Montgomery and her new husband, the Reverend Ewan Macdonald, returned to Canada from their honeymoon in Scotland in late September 1911, they settled in the rural community of Leaskdale, Ontario where Ewan was the minister of St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church. Ewan had lived in Leaskdale for a year and half while Maud cared for her grandmother Macneill in Prince Edward Island., Source type: Print(0)
Montgomery’s Other Soldiers
L.M. Montgomery kept photographs of soldiers on the wall of the Manse called “khaki row,” perhaps of the young men in her congregation like Will and Allen Mustard. We don’t know whose photos she displayed, but here is a list of some of the soldiers with whom she corresponded or knew through their families or fame, Source type: Print(0)
L.M. Montgomery, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, and Sir Andrew Macphail
On Friday September 6, 1910, Lucy Maud Montgomery received a telegram from the Lieutenant Governor of Prince Edward Island: "His Excellency Earl Grey will be in Charlottetown on Sept. 13 and wishes to meet you." The 4th Earl Grey (Albert Henry George Grey, a British nobleman) was Governor General of Canada (1904- 1911) and he was a fan of Montgomery’s popular first book, Anne of Green Gables (1908). Montgomery met him when he arrived on Prince Edward Island and joined his party at the home of Dr. Andrew Macphail., Source type: Print(0)
L.M. Montgomery’s Book Dedications
The First World War ended ninety years ago and Lucy Maud Montgomery dedicated two of her books to soldiers who died in it: The Watchman and Other Poems (1916), “To the memory of the gallant Canadian soldiers who have laid down their lives for their country and their empire,” and Rainbow Valley (1919), “To the memory of Goldwin Lapp, Robert Brookes, and Morley Shier who made the supreme sacrifice that the happy valleys of their homeland might be kept sacred from the ravage of the invader.”, Source type: Print(0)
THE L.M. MONTGOMERY INSTITUTE’S NINTH BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
The L.M. Montgomery Institute’s Ninth Biennial International Conference was expertly hosted by the University of Prince Edward Island. The topic of “Montgomery and the Matter of Nature” was a natural fit for both the presenters and attendees. The conference was housed for the first time in the new conference facility, Don and Marion McDougall Hall., Source type: Print(0)
Collecting L.M. Montgomery
Many of the members and friends of our Literary Society are collectors of early and unique editions of L. M. Montgomery’s books and artifacts [see http://home.earthlink.net/~bcavert/id6.html ]. Over the years, we have become novice “experts” on the many variations of the books by comparing collections among friends; tapping into the Montgomery expertise of archival specialists, such as Bernard Katz and Simon Lloyd; studying the publications of Montgomery bibliographers like Russell, Russell, and Wilmshurst in Ontario; and collectors like Frank and Juanita Lechowick on Prince Edward Island (A Collector's Guide to L.M. Montgomery Firsts. Charlottetown, P.E.I., 2009)., Source type: Print(0)
Harriet Gordon Smith and L.M. Montgomery The Careful Ways of Duty
When a narrative history about a person is missing, the story defaults to a construction stitched together from genealogical dates, newspaper fragments, and census transcriptions. This is the case with Harriet Gordon. Her letters from L.M. Montgomery did not survive and Montgomery’s letters from her were destroyed along with all of the author’s other correspondence. Harriet Gordon’s descendents do not know her story and now I return it to them with as much relevant detail as I can locate. I hope that they can sort out each person from all the Hatties, Gordons, and Smiths listed here. The subheads used in this article are chapter titles from Anne of Avonlea., Source type: Print(0)
MARGARET LEASK
When L.M. Montgomery settled in Leaskdale in early October of 1911 as Mrs. Ewan Macdonald, many families in her husband’s congregation, especially the younger members, welcomed her. Maud soon became acquainted with the residents of Leaskdale, especially the founding family of George Leask who lived across the road, west, from the Manse. George Leask’s son George, Jr. and his wife Margaret lived on the farm during the years the Macdonald’s were in Leaskdale. Another son, Alexander Leask, and his wife, Elizabeth Helen Morrison, lived on the farm beside the Leaskdale Church, up the hill. Mrs. Alec Leask and her daughter, Margaret, were long-time friends of Maud Macdonald., Source type: Print(0)
The Woolners
The name Woolner is one that students of Lucy Maud Montgomery will recognize. It is the maiden name of Maud's grandmother, Lucy Ann Woolner Macneill, and the middle name of her mother, Clara Woolner Macneill. The Woolners came to PEI in 1836 from Dunwich, England when Lucy Woolner was twelve years old. She had four sisters and five brothers. All of them were born in England except for the youngest daughter (b. 1836) and youngest son, named Frederic, who was born on PEI in 1842., Source type: Print(0)
Remembering A Friend of Anne
I have put off writing this issue of the Shining Scroll because it seemed to make the loss of a friend more real and more keen. Almost all of our Shining Scrolls have included news about Wilda Clark and events in Uxbridge or nearby Leaskdale Ontario, L. M. Montgomery Macdonald's home from 1910 to 1926. Wilda was our personal friend, especially for Carol Gaboury, Carolyn Collins and me. She was an honorary member of our LMM Literary Society, though she lived hundreds of miles away (we pretended that Minnesota was southern "southern" Ontario). Across the miles, we shared letters, books, articles, pictures and gifts., Source type: Print(0)
The Secret Field
Mary Beth Cavert is continuing her research and writing about the friends of L.M. Montgomery. This summer she stayed with the relatives of Alec and May MacNeill, to whom Maud dedicated Pat Of Silver Bush in 1933: "To Alec and May and The Secret Field." Here are some of her impressions., Source type: Print(0)
Arthur John Lockhart
"This is the forest primeval." These are the first lines in H. W. Longfellow's famous poem, Evangeline. L.M. Montgomery's correspondent and friend, Arthur John Lockhart, loved this poem which was about his homeland in Nova Scotia. Montgomery and Lockhart shared a deep love of their birthplaces and a personal kinship to the land where they grew up in the Maritimes of Canada - Cavendish, Prince Edward Island and Lockhartville, in Nova Scotia., Source type: Print(0)
Frede
Frederica Elmanstine Campbell, called Frede (Fred with an “e”), was Lucy Maud Montgomery’s cousin -- their mothers were sisters in the Macneill family and they had the same great-grandparents on the Montgomery side. Frede was probably named after her Aunt Johanna Fredericka Helmenstine Campbell (wife of Hon. Archibald Campbell, 1828-1901, spellings of her name vary) and grew up in the Park Corner area where the Campbell farm was located, several miles from Montgomery’s home in Cavendish. Park Corner was a place Montgomery treasured for the beauty of its setting and for the members of the three generations of Campbells who lived at the farm, later called Silver Bush, during her lifetime., Source type: Print(0)
Who Is Isabel Anderson?
L.M. Montgomery was accustomed to receiving fan letters which were full of enthusiastic hero-worship like the one addressed to "Dear Wonder Person." Montgomery was proud of her accomplishments but she was uncomfortable with the adulation of strangers. "It is well that my young worshippers don't know what a very clay-footed creature their divinity is," she wrote in 1928. At worst she characterized some of her fans as "freaks" (Green Gables Letters, 76) but more often as sweet eager admirers who made her feel useful and important., Source type: Print(0)
What Happened to Nate Lockhart?
Nate Lockhart was one of L. M. Montgomery’s best friends in her late childhood and early adolescence on Prince Edward Island. Their close friendship was the envy of their Cavendish School classmates and it was inevitable that it would blossom into young love, but only for Nate – Maud succumbed to young “like,” as was her fate with some of her favorite suitors., Source type: Print(0)
LM in Ontario
Special Issue: L.M Montgomery in Ontario, Source type: Print(0)
Muskoka Dream
Canadian author L.M. Montgomery took a rare two-week vacation at Bala, Ontario in July 1922. Maud Macdonald, husband Ewan, and sons Chester and Stuart, stayed at Roselawn Lodge on the river by the waterfalls from Lakes Muskoka and Rosseau. They ate meals at Mrs. Pykes, now the Bala Museum. They played in and on the water – they sailed, had picnics, and took drives and boat trips. Maud read, edited her manuscripts, did “fancy work” and looked at views so lovely that they “hurt.” But best of all, she spent a nearly perfect late afternoon and evening along and created what she called a “dream-built castle.”, Source type: Print(0)
The Open Fellowship of Kindred Spirits
My youth was spent idolizing names that you will recognize: Mary Rubio, Elizabeth Waterston, Elizabeth Epperly, Irene Gammel, Mollie Gillen and Rea Wilmhurst. They were the priestesses to a holy goddess. In those days I wanted to be one of them, but life took me down a path away from all that. It was a closed door, a community I could only see from afar—or so I thought., Source type: Print(0)
More Popular -- or Not So Popular -- Culture!
In July, Americans were finally able to view the third part of Kevin Sullivan's version of the AGG books, "Anne of Green Gables -- The Continuing Story. " The phrase "any resemblance to characters, living or dead, [or previously fictionalized] is entirely coincidental" can be applied, probably in capital letters and italics, to this version. There are so many differences between the books and the television version that to enumerate them would be a waste of ink. -- (editors' opinion), Source type: Print(0)
From Manse to Museum
Before I begin telling about the ribbon cutting ceremony at the Leaskdale manse where Lucy Maud Montgomery and her husband Ewan MacDonald lived from 1911-1926, I would like to give some background information as to why I was invited to, and participated in, the ceremony., Source type: Print(0)
Grace Lin
During my first semester at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, I had the privilege to see award-winning children’s author, Grace Lin speak about writing. The author of multiple picture books, the 2011 Geisel Honor Book Early Reader Series, Ling & Ting and the Newbery-Award-winning novel, When the Mountain Meets the Moon, spoke candidly about her journey from artist to writer and the writers she looked to for guidance., Source type: Print(0)
To Remember and be Remembered
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BIDEFORD PARSONAGE OPENS
In July 2000, the Bideford parsonage held its grand opening as a heritage museum site. LMM followers know the parsonage, west of Summerside, near Ellerslie, as the place she boarded while teaching in the Bideford School in 1894-95., Source type: Print(0)
THE WOOLNER JUG
Our May meeting of 2004 featured a discussion of L. M. Montgomery’s “A Tangled Web.” The main “character” in the book is an heirloom jug that members of the Dark and Penhallow clans are desperate to inherit from old Aunt Becky Penhallow Dark., Source type: Print(0)
Book Ends
The approach of Autumn seems to bring out the nesting instinct in me. I busily begin to prepare my home and gardens for the long cold winter to come. Indoors, I gather as many books as I can, and stack them in the corner by my bed, happy only when the tower reaches my pillow-top. I savor the anticipation of a crisp cool day, snug under an afghan, steaming mug of tea in hand, opening the covers of a new book to begin the familiar journey to an undiscovered world within., Source type: Print(0)
Shifting Landscapes of LMM
Any fan of Anne of Green Gables or Lucy Maud Montgomery visiting Prince Edward Island knows about the many related sites open to the public – Green Gables and the Macneill Homestead in Cavendish; the LMM Birthplace in New London; the Anne of Green Gables Museum (“Silver Bush”) and the L. M. Montgomery Heritage Museum (“Ingleside”) in Park Corner; the Bideford Manse Museum; the Cavendish Presbyterian Church; the Cavendish Post Office and so on., Source type: Print(0)
LMM's Montgomery Ancestors Arrive
Last year in connection with this year's LMM International Symposium theme "Storm and Dissonance: L. M. Montgomery and Conflict," LMMLS founder Carolyn Strom Collins presented an illustrated paper entitled " 'Bound for Quebec' or 'Journey's End'? -- Conflicting Stories of the Montgomery Family's Arrival on PEI.", Source type: Print(0)
From EVERYWOMAN’S WORLD, TORONTO, APRIL 1915 On War and Writing L. M. Montgomery’s Thoughts on World War I and Her Advice on Authoring Books as related in two rediscovered articles from 1915
While searching recently for some of L. M. Montgomery’s “lost” stories, I came across a magazine with two items of interest to those who want to know more of what L. M. Montgomery wrote and published in her career. Both articles appeared in the April 1915 issue of “Everywoman’s World” (Toronto), a monthly magazine that published a number of Montgomery’s stories and poems through the years, most notably her autobiographical series of essays she called “The Alpine Path” (1917)., Source type: Print(0)
A VISIT TO “FOUR WINDS LIGHTHOUSE"
There are not many structures that evoke the kind of romance lighthouses do, especially the ones that required a lighthouse-keeper to ensure that the light was kept burning through the dark hours of the evening to warn sailors of the dangers that lurked beneath the surface of the water close to shore., Source type: Print(0)
Following In Anne’s Footsteps
Going to Prince Edward Island to see the “Land of Anne of Green Gables”? Whether you are new to Anne’s World through the movies or the books themselves, or a long-time fan of L. M. Montgomery, the author of Anne of Green Gables, there are plenty of places to see and explore to find Anne’s World for yourself on beautiful Prince Edward Island., Source type: Print(0)
NOTES FROM PEI – 2010
Several interesting developments on PEI came to light this summer:, Source type: Print(0)
Lucy Maud Montgomery At Home in Leaskdale
On Thursday, October 13, L. M. Montgomery scholars and fans from around the world, along with many local residents, began gathering at the new St. Paul's Church in Leaskdale, Ontario, to "meet and greet" before the program celebrating the 100th anniversary of Montgomery's arrival in Leaskdale began. Jack and Linda Hutton from Bala were there for the day along with lots of others: Mary Rubio and Elizabeth Waterston, of course; Betsy Epperly, Donna Campbell, Jennie Macneill ; Yoshiko Akamatsu from Japan; Åsa and Stefan Warnqvist from Sweden; Joanne Wood, Kathy Gastle, Beverley Hayden, Edith Smith, Earle Lockerby, Linda Leader from Ontario; and many others from the Leaskdale area., Source type: Print(0)
Introduction to Montgomery’s Expanding Bibliography
In the spring of 2011, the webmaster for our L. M. Montgomery Literary Society website, Beth Cavert, received a note from Alan John Radmore, a British resident interested in Montgomery's short stories, asking if we were interested in some references he had found for her stories in newly-digitized publication records and whether we had any more information on her stories to share with him. Beth passed along Alan's request to me, Ben LeFebvre, and Christy Woster, knowing of our interest in the stories, poems, essays, and other material by and about L. M. Montgomery., Source type: Print(0)

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